Category Archives: Art

Art Posts

Police Commandos Bust Art Patrons

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A nice evening at an art gallery became a nightmare for art patrons in Detroit last Saturday. The Detroit police, dressed in commando uniforms and carrying powerful weapons burst into a regular monthly party at the Contemporary Art Institute of Detroit (CAID) and forced the art lovers to the floor at gunpoint. Aaron Timlin, the Executive Director of the CAID, said “There were serious civil liberties issues here.” Many in the gallery described the police as being abusive to the crowd that was comprised mostly of young people who live in nearby Detroit suburbs.

 

One patron posted an account of the raid on his MySpace page. In his post, he recalls that, “One man was an attorney. The man stood on his knees, asking the police what was happening, explaining his occupation as an attorney. He was promptly kicked in the back, and forced onto his hands.”

What was the violation that caused the Detroit police commandos to execute a swift and brutal raid upon the patrons of this art gallery? The offense was loitering – which is kind of what you do in an art gallery anyway isn’t it? In total, 130 patrons were issued tickets and 44 of their vehicles were impounded. The police claim the tickets were issued for “loitering in a place of illegal alcohol after hours.” However, when the police visited the CAID six weeks ago over similar “issues” they were described as being “nice and helpful.” Perhaps this was the surveillance before the big raid…they’re sneaky like that.

 

The Contemporary Art Institute of Detroit is a nonprofit organization that has promoted art and art education in the Detroit area for 29 years. The police commando raid took place in a 119 year old building on the west side of Detroit.

On: Aesthetics (Part 1)

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INTRODUCTION TO AESTHETICS
Aesthetics is the branch of philosophy that aims to establish the general principles of art and beauty. It can be divided into the philosophy of art and the philosophy of beauty. Although some philosophers have considered one of these a subdivision of the other, the philosophies of art and beauty are essentially different. The philosophy of beauty recognizes aesthetic phenomena outside of art, as in nature or in nonartistic cultural phenomena such as morality, science, or mathematics; it is concerned with art only insofar as art is beautiful. The history of the arts in the West, however, has made it increasingly clear that there is much more to art than beauty and that art often has little or nothing to do with beauty. Until the 18th century, the philosophy of beauty was generally given more attention than the philosophy of art. Since that time, aestheticians have devoted more energy to the philosophy of art.

THE METAPHYSICS OF ART

Aestheticians are concerned about two aspects of the metaphysics of art:
(1) What is the ontological status of works of art? Or, what kind of entity is a work of art?
(2) What access does art give the viewer to reality? Or, what kind of knowledge does art yield?


The first question arises, in part, because some works of art, such as sculptures, are much like ordinary physical objects;  others, such as paintings, have aspects that suggest that not all works of art can be merely physical objects. A painting, for example, is typically flat, but it can represent spatial depth;  and what the painting represents often seems more relevant aesthetically than its physical dimensions. To some aestheticians, the representational character seems to be what is essential to a painting as a work of art. Some philosophers have therefore concluded that works of art are mental entities of some sort, because it is mental entities, such as visions and dreams, that are typically representational. Other philosophers, who have noticed that artists can and do express some of their own attitudes, emotions, and personality traits in their art, have concluded that art works belong in a category with nonverbal communications rather than with physical objects.

 

A different line of thought suggests that works of art are not like objects even on a first impression. For example, the score of a symphony is not the same as the symphony. The score is a set of directions for playing the music, but the musical work can exist even if no one ever plays the score. Considerations such as these have led many philosophers to say that works of art exist only in the minds of their creators and of their hearers, viewers, or readers.

The question whether art can provide knowledge of, or insight into, reality is as old as philosophy itself. Plato argued in The Republic that art has the power to represent only the appearances of reality. According to this theory, a painter reproduces (imitates) a subject on canvas. The counterposition, that art can yield insight into the real, is commonly held by modern philosophers, artists, and critics. Many critics, in fact, allege that art offers a special, nondiscursive, and intuitive knowledge of reality that science and philosophy cannot achieve.

 
“Aesthetics or anaesthetics? That is the question.”


c>log Related Articles
On: Aesthetics (Part 2)
On: Aesthetics (Part 3)
On: Aesthetics (Part 4)

On: Randomness

c>log

Made. Done. Happening. Chosen without method. Chosen without conscious deliberation.

                                                

..and then she asked me: ‘What’s you’re sign?’ 
I blinked and answered, ‘Neon!’ just to blow her mind.


It looks like big brother is here to stay.

This is one of the little known stories of modern American Life.

As part of the information superhighway you can find interesting information about yourself.
If you really want to.

Well there is always the old ancient time tested method of word-of-mouth.
You tell one person and then they tell another until everyone knows.
The
only problem is that each teller usually embellishes or changes the story
and distorts the information. This mode of communication is the slowest and least reliable.

 


Computers talking to computers is not the only means of utilizing the web for communicating your ideas.

More than anything else though, think about your role in the world. 
Don’t be one of society’s ignorant consumers.


<<GURGLE>> <<GURGLE>> AHHHHHH <<COUGH>> <<COUGH>>

Which month was all this in?

What other cities do they fly from?  Memphis, hope hope.

Chuckle….forget the berries…slip it into kudzoo vines! HA!

Excuse my ignorance please…<blush>…but what is the ‘kill’?

Convince me the rest of the way, and show me the way to do it, and be prepared to witness the biggest economic and social shakeup the planet has ever seen…if I feel up to it, thank you.

If I knew how to run for high public office, I would, just to shake things up a bit. Just kidding.

This echo, as I perceive it, is a willing proponent of governmental restrictions…oxymoron comes to mind.

I think I can take this to the simple level people understand. Why is dumping illegal?

Nothing personal, flames, or off topic.

I’m really regretting not going to see the pavement last week.

What’s worse is, they just call you in the office and snip a couple hairs without any warning.

 


I don’t know if we say it. If we do, we dont’ realize it.

I’m sorry, but I have no idea what this conversation was about. 
I have not been on in
awhile, so mabye that is why…later.

I like the quotes. This is most important. Everything you read, if your well being depends on it,
should be checked for factual content or at least a small amount of truth.

Winter is the off season i suppose?  I picture Holland under a constant drizzle in winter.  But then, ice skating while cruising on dull blades makes no sense.

Go visit a small town sometime.

I dislike being an adult in many more ways than I liked being young. 

Hahaha… exactly.  Do you know why old people are always coming down on young people for the stuff they’re doing?  It’s because they’re old!

 


That’s the privilege of being me.

I plead guilty to typos and double negatives. Occasionally, I confuse pronouns with commas.

What would you rather have, isolationism?

There is a debate raging in every contending section of the United States ruling class…

I just want to find out if the general population accepts this model. And, if so, has the acceptance increased or decreased?  Thanks for the input.

People’s right to own the land they work is inalienable and the warrior’s cry of
“land and freedom” continues to reverberate on this soil.

Well, I would say go with public address. Currently it is superior.


Rest In Peace: Robert Rauschenberg

c>log
Robert Rauschenberg, American artist, died May 12 at the age of 82. Rauschenberg is considered by many to be one of American’s most influential artists and he was instrumental in the transition from the Abstract Expressionism movement of the late 1950s to the Pop Art movement of the early 1960s. Rauschenberg is most famous for his series of “Combines” in which he employed non-traditional materials and objects in very unusual ways. Rauschenberg was known for collecting interesting pieces of trash on his walks through New York City for use in his works. His “Combines” are considered both painting and sculpture.

 

Rauschenberg’s formal art training is nearly as impressive as his storied career. Born in Port Arthur, Texas, he attended art school at the legendary Black Mountain College near Asheville, North Carolina where he studied under the rigorous teachings of famous Bauhaus artist Josef Albers. Rauschenberg also studied art with New York School artists Franz Kline and Jack Twokov as well as photographer Aaron Siskind. He met John Cage and learned about performance and its link to mulit-media art which would become an important part of his later works. Besides his works of art, Rauschenberg will also be well remembered for his fearless experimentation and unending innovation.

Color Chart: Reinventing Color (03)

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Color Chart Reinventing Color, 1950 to Today is an exhibition on a current run at the Museum of Modern Art. The exhibition started March 2 and will end on May 12 and features the works of forty-four artists. The MoMA staff has made available a series of discussions by curators and art historians regarding the works contained in the exhibit in a podcast format. The c>log will highlight several of the works in the exhibition and the appropriate podcasts will be available for listening here. Color Chart is the first major exhibition devoted to this pivotal transformation by contemporary artists.

 

Color Chart celebrates a paradox: the lush beauty that results when contemporary artists assign color decisions to chance, to a readymade source or to an arbitrary system of color. Midway through the 20th century, long-held convictions regarding the spiritual truth or scientific validity of particular colors gave way to an excitement about color as a mass-produced and standardized commercial product.

The romantic quest for personal expression instead became Andy Warhol’s “I want to be a machine;” the artistry of mixing pigments was eclipsed by Frank Stella’s “Straight out of the can; it can’t get any better than that.” Persistent beliefs regarding the spiritual or emotional power of colors gave way to the embrace of color as an ordinary commodity.

One of the lesser known painters included in the exhibition is John Chamberlain, an American pop artist and sculptor. These color field paintings painted in 1963 may be a throwback to the color field paintings of the Abstract Expresssionists of the 1950s, but Chamberlain chose ready-made colors for this series of paintings. In fact, the colors he chose for these paintings were automobile colors – straight from Detroit and straight from the can. These paintings most likely were inspired by Chamberlain’s earlier sculptures made from crumpled car parts which of course came pre-painted with ready-made colors. Ann Temkin, Curator of Painting and Sculpture at the Museum of Modern Art gives a short analysis of these paintings by John Chamberlain.

 

Related c<log Articles
Color Chart: Reinventing Color (01)
Color Chart: Reinventing Color (02)
On: Simultaneous Contrast
The Good And Bad Of Green

Color Chart: Reinventing Color (02)

c>log
Color Chart Reinventing Color, 1950 to Today is an exhibition on a current run at the Museum of Modern Art. The exhibition started March 2 and will end on May 12 and features the works of forty-four artists. The MoMA staff has made available a series of discussions by curators and art historians regarding the works contained in the exhibit in a podcast format. The c>log will highlight several of the works in the exhibition and the appropriate podcasts will be available for listening here. Color Chart is the first major exhibition devoted to this pivotal transformation by contemporary artists.

 

Color Chart celebrates a paradox: the lush beauty that results when contemporary artists assign color decisions to chance, to a readymade source or to an arbitrary system of color. Midway through the 20th century, long-held convictions regarding the spiritual truth or scientific validity of particular colors gave way to an excitement about color as a mass-produced and standardized commercial product.

The romantic quest for personal expression instead became Andy Warhol’s “I want to be a machine;” the artistry of mixing pigments was eclipsed by Frank Stella’s “Straight out of the can; it can’t get any better than that.” Persistent beliefs regarding the spiritual or emotional power of colors gave way to the embrace of color as an ordinary commodity.

Probably the most logical decision in this exhibition is the inclusion of Andy Warhol. Ann Temkin, Curator of Painting and Sculpture at the Museum of Modern Art, gives a short analyis of Warhol’s 1962 series of “Do It Yourself Paintings” and his 1962 series of Marilyn Monroe images sometimes called “the flavor Marilyns” which were completed by Warhol just a couple of months after her suicide in August 1962. These are the last paintings by Warhol that were actually hand-painted by him before he switched over to the silk screen printing process.

 

 

Related c<log Articles
Color Chart: Reinventing Color (01)
Color Chart: Reinventing Color (03)
On: Simultaneous Contrast
The Good And Bad Of Green