Rest In Peace: Heath Ledger

c>log
Actor Heath Ledger, one of the stars of Brokeback Mountain, was found dead in his bed in his Manhattan apartment, at 3:35 p.m., New York City police said Tuesday. He was 28 years of age. Sleeping pills were found in the bed around him, police said.

Ledger, who was born in Australia, was nominated for an Oscar for Brokeback Mountain. He played the suicidal son of Billy Bob Thornton in Monster’s Ball and had starring roles in A Knight’s Tale and The Patriot. He was to appear as the Joker this year in The Dark Night, a sequel to 2005’s Batman Begins that recently finished filming.


c>log UPDATE
An
autopsy on actor Heath Ledger was inconclusive, and more tests are
needed, the New York City Medical Examiner’s Office stated today. A
spokesperson for the Medical Examiner’s Office said that it will take
about 10 days to complete the investigation. There was no obvious
indication of suicide or foul play according to the New York City
Police Department. The police are now “investigating the possibility of
an overdose.”

c>lognote
We seem to have a Celebrity Death Trilogy going on now….
Or, is it a Celebrity Death Trifecta ?
(All Titles TM 2008)

Rest In Peace: Suzanne Pleshette

c>log
Suzanne Pleshette ( born January 31, 1937 –  died January 19, 2008) was an American character actress, best known for her role as Bob Newhart’s wife, Emily Hartley, on the Bob Newhart Show in the 1970s. She co-starred with Bob Newhart in the popular Bob Newhart Show on CBS in which she played school teacher married to a Chicago psychologist. After the end of the Bob Newhart Show, she went on to other work but was called back to reprise her role as Emily in what is probably the most-liked finale to a sit-com ever fillmed. Bob Newhart had gone on to star in another sit-com called Newhart in which he played a New England inn keeper. In the final scene of the final episode of Newhart, just as in the final scenes of the Bob Newhart Show, Bob and Emily are in bed together when he wakes up and tells her that the entire Newhart series was a nightmare caused by “eating too much Japanese food before going to bed”.

Suzanne Pleshette also was an accomplished actress before she landed in the world of television sit-coms. Pleshette appeared in over two dozen made-for-television movies and numerous feature film of the late 1950s, 1960s and 1970s, and was nominated for an Emmy Award on several occasions, most notably for Dr. Kildare. A former stage actress, she replaced Anne Bancroft in the Broadway version of The Miracle Worker (opposite Patty Duke), to rave reviews. She also provided the voices of Yubaba and Zeniba in the English dub of Japanese director Hayao Miyazaki’s Academy Award-winning film Spirited Away. Her most memorable film role was that of schoolteacher Annie Hayworth opposite Rod Taylor in Alfred Hitchcock’s classic film The Birds (1963).

In 1998, Pleshette provided the voice of Zira in the Disney sequel The Lion King II: Simba’s Pride. After John Ritter’s death in September 2003, she played the mother of Katey Sagal’s character in the ABC sitcom 8 Simple Rules for Dating My Teenage Daughter. Pleshette also starred in several other television series, including Suzanne Pleshette Is Maggie Briggs, Bridges to Cross, Nightingales, The Boys Are Back, Good Morning, Miami and Hart to Hart. She also guest-starred in several episodes of the NBC sitcom Will & Grace, playing the estranged mother of Megan Mullally’s character Karen Walker. Her role in the series would be her last acting performance.

         

Dreadnought: The Martin D-28 Guitar

c>log
The Beginnings Of The Martin D-28
The  shape of the body of the guitar which would become the venerable Martin D-28 was made with a wider waist than was thought customary at the time and a much deeper body. This guitar design first appeared in 1916 on a range of guitars made by a partnership of the C.F. Martin guitar company of Nazareth, Pennsylvania and the Oliver Ditson Company, a retail and wholesale distributor with outlets in Boston and New York. Very few examples of this guitar style exist today, and should one present itself to collectors, it would fetch a huge price.

The D-28 Enters Hits The Market In Full Production
In 1931, C.F. Martin introduced the D body shape guitars, the D-1 and the D-2. The D stands for Dreadnought which is the name for the largest  of British battleships. Extremely limited numbers of the D-1 and D-2 were made and they have become the most collectible of all guitars. When the guitar went into full production, it was entered into the familiar Martin guitar numbering system. The system consisted of a letter of the alphabet to designate body size and shape and was followed by a number to indicate the style of finish and woods used. There were many of the D-Series guitars that were made. Some were less fancy than others using mahogany wood for the body. Some of the D-Series guitars were very ornate with herringbone trim features and exotic woods. The Martin D-28 used a Brazilian rosewood for the body and that is what has found its way into the souls of guitarists from all genres of music.

The King Played A Martin D-28 And Made It Cool
Why did country and rockabilly stars such as Elvis Presley, Hank Williams, Hank Snow and George Jones pick the Martin D-28? Well, the D-28 put out a big booming rhythm sound full of big fat bass but it would also cover the upper ranges equally as well. This sound was perfect for rockabilly, country music and bluegrass music. And the rest, as they say….is history.

The D-28 Is Still Handmade After All These Years
The D-28 has stayed largely the same shape since 1934. The construction has changed a little over the years with only slight variations on the original design.  East Indian rosewood is now used in the construction of the guitar instead of the original Brazilian rosewood. Martin has also reduced the size of the neck and made some alterations to the herringbone trim features. C.F. Martin still calls its guitars “hand made” — because they are still handmade the way they used to be made. The Martin D-28 Dreadnought is easily the most copied guitar of all-time  because it is  most desired guitar of all-time.

        

 (1956) Elvis With His Martin D-28  The Special/Limited Edition Elvis D-28 Elvis’ Hand-Tooled Leather Cover For His D-28

Rest In Peace: Richard Kneer, Founder of Wham-O

c>log
Richard Knerr, co-founder of Wham-O Inc, passed away Monday at the age of 82 after suffering from a stroke. His business partner, Arthur “Spud” Melin, preceded him in death in 2002.

With his boyhood best friend, Arthur “Spud” Melin, Knerr started the company in 1948 in Pasadena. The name Wham-O was onomotopoeia for the sound made when the slingshot hit the target. The company certainly had a talent for coming up with catchy names, starting huge crazes with toys like the Hula Hoop, Hacky Sack, and Slip’n Slide, Wheelie-Bar, and Silly String.

Everybody’s lives have been touched by this man, the visionary pioneer behind Super Balls, Frisbees, Water Wiggles, Super Elastic Bubble Plastic and the unforgettable Hula Hoop. At one point, Wham-O sold 25 million Hula Hoops in a four month period and was producing 20,000 Hula Hoops per day in seven countries. Richard Knerr was never afraid to try anything new and the approach sometimes resulted in flops such as the do-it-yourself fallout shelter.

Founded in 1948, Wham-O is now owned by Cornerstone Overseas Investment, based in Hong Kong.

 
   
 

Out Of Stock: Jenks White 2007

c<log

“Yeah hi, Lumbergh here. Just wanted to
let you know that the Jenks White designs
have been taken out-of-stock. This includes
the Jenks White 2007 design and the Jenks
White Number One design.”

“If you would like to see any of these
designs again or if you would like to
order something you’ve had in mind for
awhile, please contact me here at the
EricHatheway.com Global OnLine Store.
Thanks. Oh, and I almost forgot, here
is my eMail address.”

Lumbergh, Global Store Manager
   sales@erichatheway.com


 

Blackjack! c>log Hits 21,000 Words

c>log
We almost didn’t notice, but the c>log has recently topped 20,000 word units (or, units of cloggage).


21,139 words…….

      

     “Looks like fun”

We’re just gonna keep on clogging (up the internet)……
the c>log

Happy Birthday Helvetica!

c>log
Helvetica is a feature-length independent film about typography, graphic design and global visual culture. It looks at the proliferation of one typeface (which is celebrating its 50th birthday this year) as part of a larger conversation about the way type affects our lives. Helvetica is currently screening at film festivals, museums, design conferences, and cinemas worldwide.

The film is an exploration of urban spaces in major cities and the type that inhabits them, and a fluid discussion with renowned designers about their work, the creative process, and the choices and aesthetics behind their use of type. Helvetica encompasses the worlds of design, advertising, psychology, and communication, and invites us to take a second look at the thousands of words we see every day. If you get a chance, check this out. Helvetica is in your life more than you think!


About the Typeface
Helvetica was developed by Max Miedinger with Eduard Hoffmann in 1957 for the Haas Type Foundry in Münchenstein, Switzerland. In the late 1950s, the European design world saw a revival of older sans-serif typefaces such as the German face Akzidenz Grotesk. Haas’ director Hoffmann commissioned Miedinger, a former employee and freelance designer, to draw an updated sans-serif typeface to add to their line. The result was called Neue Haas Grotesk, but its name was later changed to Helvetica, derived from Helvetia, the Latin name for Switzerland, when Haas’ German parent companies Stempel and Linotype began marketing the font internationally in 1961.

Introduced amidst a wave of popularity of Swiss design, and fueled by advertising agencies selling this new design style to their clients, Helvetica quickly appeared in corporate logos, signage for transportation systems, fine art prints, and myriad other uses worldwide. Inclusion of the font in home computer systems such as the Apple Macintosh in 1984 only further cemented its ubiquity.


Artist, Designer & Photographer

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